Permanent Residency


EXPRESS ENTRY – JANUARY 2015

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) launched a new electronic system called Express Entry to manage applications for permanent residence under these federal economic immigration programs:

  • Federal Skilled Worker Program,
  • Federal Skilled Trades Program,
  • Canadian Experience Class, and
  • A Portion of the Provincial Nominee Programs (PNP).

The Express Entry system has two steps:

Step 1) Potential candidates complete an online Express Entry profile and, if required, register with the Job Bank.

CARO GLOBAL will submit a complete online Express Entry profile through the advocates Immigration Portal. This is a secure form that they will use to provide information about the candidates in following areas:

  • skills,
  • work experience,
  • language ability,
  • education, and
  • other details that will help CIC to assess the potential Candidates

Those who meet the criteria of one of the federal immigration programs listed above will be accepted into a pool of candidates.

JOB BANK

After creating the profile anyone who does not already have a job offer supported by a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), or a nomination from a province or territory, must register with Employment and Social Development Canada’s (ESDC) Job Bank. Job Bank will help connect Express Entry candidates with eligible employers in Canada.

CARO GLOBAL WILL REGISTER THE CANDIDATE WITH (ESDC).

Candidates are also encouraged to promote themselves to employers in other ways, such as using job boards, recruiters etc.

In most cases when there is a job being offered to a candidate, employers will need an LMIA from ESDC. The LMIA process ensures employers have made an effort to hire Canadians for available jobs. There will be no LMIA fee for permanent resident applications.

Step 2) The highest-ranking candidates in the pool will be invited to apply for permanent residence

Please note that a candidate does not need to have a job offer to get invited as every 20 months an algorithm will choose the best profiles and higher rankings to be invited to apply.

There is no limit to the number of people who may enter the Express Entry pool. We expect this to result in a range of candidates with a greater variety of skills and experience from which employers, provinces and territories can select to meet their needs. However, the government will base the number of candidates who get an ITA for permanent residence on the Annual Immigration Levels Plan. The Levels Plan will still set out the broad admission ranges for the immigration programs that are part of Express Entry.

Express Entry will create an inventory of high-quality candidates who employers in Canada will be able to consider when they cannot find Canadians or permanent residents to fill job vacancies.

Under Express Entry, labour market demand, in the form of a job offer supported by a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) or a nomination by a province or territory will provide candidates with enough additional points and be ranked high enough to be invited to apply at the next eligible draw of candidates. Draws will be made from the Express Entry pool on a regular basis, and instructions for each draw will be posted on the Government of Canada website. Note that all job offers will be subject to Employment and Social Development Canada’s (ESDC’s) LMIA requirements in place at that time.

Employers and potential candidates will also benefit from faster processing. CIC’s goal is a six-month or less processing time from the day we receive a complete application for permanent residence to the day a final decision is made.

Quebec won’t use the Express Entry as they select their own Skilled Workers, however, the rest of the provinces will use Express Entry!

How will provinces and territories use the Express Entry system?

Provinces and territories will be able to nominate a certain number of foreign nationals through the Express Entry system to meet their local immigration and labour market needs. If an applicant gets a nomination from a province or territory, they will be given enough additional points to be invited to apply for permanent residence at the next eligible draw of candidates.

Just as they manage their own Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) now, provinces and territories will set the criteria they use to nominate Express Entry candidates.

Express Entry candidates may either:

  • enter the pool first, and then be nominated by a province or territory; or
  • be nominated by a province or territory, and then complete an online Express Entry profile.

Note: All prospective candidates (whether PNP applicants or not) must meet the criteria of at least one of the federal immigration programs managed through Express Entry in order to enter the pool, and must submit their application online.

Provinces and territories will also continue to be able to make nominations under their regular (“base”) PNPs outside of Express Entry via a paper application process.

What is the process for potential candidates who want to use both a Provincial Nominee Program and Express Entry?

There are two ways to do this. A person can:

  • apply to the PNP first, get a nomination and then fill out an Express Entry profile; or
  • fill out the Express Entry profile first. Provinces and territories can then search the Express Entry pool and ask a candidate to apply for their PNP. When the candidate gets a nomination certificate, they will update their Express Entry profile.

In either case, once a person updates their Express Entry profile to show they have a provincial or territorial nomination certificate, they will be given enough additional points to be invited to apply at the next eligible draw of candidates.

How will employers in Canada use the Express Entry system?

Employers in Canada must first make every effort to try and find a Canadian or permanent resident to fill vacant job opportunities. Eligible employers who cannot find a Canadian or permanent resident for a permanent job will be able to consider candidates from the pool who meet their needs.

Employers can access candidates:

  • through their current recruiting and hiring practices, including private sector job boards; or
  • through Job Bank later in 2015. Job Bank will help match candidates with eligible employers in Canada and jobs based on their skills, knowledge and experience.

In some cases employers can also work with provinces and territories through the respective nominee programs.

Jobs offered to Express Entry candidates will be subject to the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) requirements in place at that time. Those who get a job offer supported by an LMIA will quickly be given an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence.

Will there be a list of eligible occupations for Express Entry?

No. Express Entry will not include an eligible occupation list or occupation caps at the time of launch.

To be eligible to enter the pool, Express Entry candidates must have skilled work experience in a National Occupational Code (NOC) 0, A or B occupation. Jobs offered to candidates in the pool must be in one of these categories.

Job offers are also subject to the LMIA requirements in place at that time.

Candidates must also meet the minimum language requirements (for NOC 0 and A occupations: CLB 7; for NOC B occupations: CLB 5).

Will employers in Canada be able to access the Express Entry pool directly?

Employers will be able to access candidates in the pool through Job Bank. Job Bank and Express Entry will let eligible employers in Canada and eligible skilled foreign nationals connect with one another more easily.

Express Entry candidates will need to register with Job Bank if they do not already have a Canadian job offer or a provincial/territorial nomination. This will give them the opportunity to view jobs available with employers in Canada and to begin promoting themselves to employers, recruiters, private sector job boards, etc.

Later in 2015, Job Bank will “match” eligible employers with Express Entry candidates who meet their job description when there are no Canadians or permanent residents available to do the job.

Employers will also be able to direct candidates they find on their own to use Express Entry.

Can an employer who currently employs a temporary foreign worker (TFW) use Express Entry to support their application for permanent residence?

Yes. As long as the TFW is in Canada working under a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), you can offer them a permanent job to support their application for permanent residence. Your TFW would have to create an Express Entry profile and include their job offer information. A job offer supported by an LMIA will give a candidate enough additional points and be ranked high enough to be invited to apply at the next eligible draw of candidates.

If you are considering permanently hiring a TFW and you do not have a positive LMIA for the job, you will first need to make every effort to try and find a Canadian or permanent resident to fill the job opportunity. You will need to meet LMIA requirements, including posting your job ad on Employment and Social Development Canada’s (ESDC) Job Bank in addition to advertising in two other places. If you have done this and have been unsuccessful in filling your job opportunity, you can apply for an LMIA for the TFW through Service Canada. The TFW would then have to create an Express Entry profile, meet the minimum criteria and include their job offer information so they get enough additional points and be ranked high enough to be invited to apply at the next eligible draw of candidates.

Can an Express Entry candidate come to Canada and start working before they get their permanent residence visa?

Express Entry candidates cannot usually come to Canada to work until they have their permanent resident visa. In some cases, candidates will already be in Canada with a temporary work permit.

Employers who need a worker to start before the permanent resident visa is processed, can apply for a “dual intent” Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). Note that in this type of situation, an employer will need to pay the LMIA processing fee. A “dual intent” LMIA means a person can come to Canada as a temporary foreign worker (TFW) first and work while they wait for a decision on their permanent residence application. In this case, a candidate must still apply for a work permit and meet the requirements for TFWs.

Express Entry candidates who have a job offer and have been invited to apply will not automatically be given a temporary work permit or temporary resident visa.

Will candidates with job offers be given priority?

A job offer supported by a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) will give a candidate enough additional points to be invited to apply at the next eligible draw of candidates. Potential candidates who have a valid job offer or provincial/territorial nomination when they complete their Express Entry profile will not need to register with Job Bank.

How does Job Bank work with Express Entry?

Job Bank and Express Entry let eligible employers in Canada and eligible skilled foreign nationals connect with one another more easily. Every effort must be made by the employer to first try and find a Canadian or permanent resident to fill their job vacancy before a skilled immigrant can be considered.

In most cases, employers wishing to hire a foreign national must register with Employment and Social Development Canada’s (ESDC) Job Bank and post their employment ad for a minimum of 30 days (as well as meet other advertising requirements). If a Canadian or permanent resident is not found, employers can extend their job ad and broaden their candidate search to include foreign workers. If a qualified foreign national is found, the employer can then apply for an Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). The employer must apply for an LMIA in order to hire the foreign candidate.

ESDC will assess all LMIA applications. In many cases, employers will need a positive LMIA to make a qualifying job offer to a foreign national under Express Entry.

Should the Express Entry candidate choose to apply to a job opportunity, the recipient employer will then be required to go through their usual interview or assessment process. If the employer finds that the Express Entry candidate meets their needs, and they are eligible to hire a foreign national, they can offer them a job.

Employers with a positive LMIA will then provide this information along with a job offer letter to the candidate to include in their Express Entry profile. This is so they can more quickly be offered an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence in the next eligible draw.

Eligible employers can be matched later in 2015 with qualified candidates in the Express Entry pool.

Through Job Bank, Express Entry candidates will be able to explore jobs and, later in 2015, they will be able to sign up with Job Match to view jobs that match their skill set and qualifications.

How does an employer in Canada get matched with Express Entry candidates in Job Bank?

Later in 2015, Job Bank will start to make matches between eligible employers in Canada and eligible Express Entry candidates if the employer’s job has been advertised to Canadians for one month or longer.

Employers will continue to be matched to Canadian and permanent resident Job Seeker profiles while their job is advertised on Job Bank. Matches will be made based on an employer’s job listing and a candidate’s skills, knowledge and experience. To be matched, candidates must be eligible through Express Entry.

Are Express Entry candidate profiles in Job Bank matched to more than one employer?

Later in 2015, when Job Match for Express Entry candidates is in place, an eligible Express Entry candidate could be matched to more than one employer if the candidate’s skill set matches the needs of more than one job description. This could be the case for any Job Seeker profile in Job Bank.

If the candidate is currently waiting for an application for permanent residence to be processed in the Federal Skilled Worker Program, can they submit an Express Entry profile?

A candidate may submit a new Express Entry profile, but it is not necessary. However, there will be no refunds of any processing fees paid related to the original application. The existing application will be processed based on the rules in place at the time they applied.

If a candidate chooses to create an Express Entry profile and are invited to apply, they will be required to submit a new application for permanent residence and the associated processing fees.

When does a candidate’s profile expire?

Express Entry profiles will be valid for one year from the date a candidate submits a profile to CIC. If a candidate does not get an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence after 12 months and they still want to come to Canada as a skilled immigrant, they will need to complete and submit a new profile. Candidates will have 60 days to resubmit their existing Express Entry profile through MyCIC. They will need to update and validate the information, and if they still meet minimum entry criteria, they will receive a new Express Entry Profile Number. If they do not resubmit their profile within 60 days, they will have to complete a new profile.

Express Entry Pool

Do the candidate need a job offer to get into the Express Entry pool?

If you meet the criteria of one of the economic immigration programs subject to Express Entry, you will be accepted into the Express Entry pool. A job offer supported by an Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from an employer in Canada is a significant asset, but not a requirement.

If the candidate is in the Express Entry pool, could I be eligible for more than one program?

It is possible for you to get into the pool and be eligible for more than one immigration program. In that case, your profile would be tagged by the system to make sure it is considered for any relevant draws. If you get an Invitation to Apply (ITA), the system will tell you which immigration program you are being invited to apply to.

Comprehensive Ranking System

What is the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) and how does it work? PLEASE SEE THE CRS BELOW

The CRS is the new system we will use to assess and score Express Entry candidates. It has been created based on extensive research on the best predictors of economic success for newcomers to Canada.

The CRS will include factors such as:

  • skills;
  • work experience;
  • language ability;
  • education; and
  • other factors that we know help immigrants prosper once in Canada.

Using the information provided in the candidate’s profile, the CRS will set the candidate’s score and rank within the Express Entry pool at any given time. Note that a candidate’s rank will change regularly, while their score will only change when they update their profile information.

Candidates with the highest scores in the pool will be issued an Invitation to Apply (ITA). Candidates will be awarded points for:

  • a job offer;
  • a provincial/territorial nomination; and
  • skills and experience factors that contribute to success in Canada.
Do I need a job offer to get an Invitation to Apply (ITA)?

A qualifying job offer from an employer in Canada is a significant asset but not a requirement. Candidates can also obtain enough points to receive an ITA based on how high their score is on the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) or if they get a provincial or territorial nomination. Provinces and territories will be able to recruit candidates from the Express Entry pool through their PNPs to meet local labour market needs.

How long is an Invitation to Apply (ITA) valid for?

Candidates who get an ITA will have 60 days to submit a complete electronic application for permanent residence. Extensions will not be granted.

Processing Times

How will Express Entry result in faster processing times?

Under Express Entry, we will only accept applications from people we have invited to come to Canada. This will prevent the growth of backlogs by ensuring that only the candidates who are most likely to succeed economically – not simply the first to submit their application – are able to apply to immigrate to Canada.

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) plans to process the majority of complete electronic applications (those that include all the required supporting documents) within six months or less.

Together, these will do away with multi-year waits for a final decision on permanent residence and result in faster processing times.

When does the six-month processing timeline begin and end?

The six months begins once Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) confirms that a person has submitted a complete electronic application for permanent residence through the online system. It ends when a final decision is made.

In some cases, processing can be delayed, such as when an applicant needs extra time to complete their medical assessments.

The six month processing time does not include time outside the control of CIC, for example, the time it takes for an employer to obtain an LMIA, or a potential candidate to receive a provincial/territorial nomination or to arrive in Canada and land as a permanent resident.

Note: The six month processing time is for permanent residence applications under the Express Entry system. Applications received before Express Entry will be processed based on the rules in place at the time the application was received.

Language Testing and Educational Credential Assessments (ECAs)

How does Express Entry use the information from language tests or an Education Credential Assessment (ECA)?

The Express Entry system uses the information in a number of different ways.

When you fill out your profile, the ECA is used (where applicable) to see if you meet the criteria to get into the Express Entry pool.

Before candidates can enter the Express Entry pool, all candidates’ profiles are awarded points through the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) based on their language scores and educational attainment from a Canadian institution or educational credential from a foreign institution that has been validated through an ECA report completed by an organization designated by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC).

Note: If THE Candidate want to apply to the Federal Skilled Worker Program, must have an ECA. If you candidate is hoping to apply to the Federal Skilled Trades Program or Canadian Experience Class, an ECA is optional, but it may help them to earn more points for education on the CRS and improve your chances of being drawn from the pool.

Do I need to get an Education Credential Assessment (ECA)?

An ECA is required for candidates in the Express Entry pool who wish to be considered for draws related to the Federal Skilled Worker Program, unless they were educated in Canada.

For candidates who are hoping to apply to the Federal Skilled Trades Program or Canadian Experience Class, an ECA is optional but may increase the points they receive on the CRS and improve their chances of being drawn from the pool.

Does an Education Credential Assessment (ECA) mean that an applicant’s professional credentials have been recognized to get a license in a regulated profession?

No. Getting an ECA for immigration does not mean that your work experience and professional credentials are automatically recognized in Canada to get a license in a regulated profession. If you work in a regulated profession, you must still go through the process of getting your license in the province or territory that you plan on settling in. Regulatory authorities determine an applicant’s readiness for licensure by assessing and recognizing “qualifications,” which may include an assessment of education, experience/competencies and language proficiency, in addition to other requirements. Applicants intending to work in a regulated profession should contact the regulatory authority in the province where they plan to live to find out more about how to obtain licensure.

What organizations can complete an Education Credential Assessment (ECA) or language test?

CIC has selected three organizations that can assess any foreign educational credential:

  • Comparative Education Service: University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies;
  • International Credential Assessment Service of Canada; and
  • World Education Services, Canada.

If you are applying:

  • as a specialist physician (NOC 3111) or general practitioner/family physician (NOC 3112), theMedical Council of Canada must do an ECA for your primary medical diploma;
  • as a pharmacist (NOC 3131), the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada must do your ECA.

Note: ECAs done by the two professional bodies designated by CIC (Medical Council of Canada and Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada) are used by CIC for immigration purposes and are recognized by the profession’s regulatory authorities as one component of their overall licensure process. Please contact the regulatory authority in the province where you plan to live for more information on the licensure process.

For any other occupation, check the websites of the other CIC-designated organizations or contact them directly to find out which one best suits your needs. Consider the following:

  • Some designated organizations partner with certain regulatory bodies or large employers. That means that the ECA you obtain for your application to CIC might also help you later on.
  • Check with each designated organization to find out what other organizations recognize their assessments.

When we create the Express Entry profile, CARO Global must have to include the test identifier and results score of your language test. If you completed your education outside Canada, you will also have to show what your (ECA) report lists as the equivalent Canadian education. You must also include the report’s reference number (sometimes known as the “CIC number”). We will verify the information you gave us with the testing/assessment organizations if you are invited to apply for permanent residence.

You should also update your profile any time you receive updated language test scores or ECA results.

If you get an ITA, we may ask for more information about your results as we process your application for permanent residence.

Note: Language tests and/or ECAs will be validated with the organization that issued them. If the candidate gives false information at any point in the process, the candidate could be:

  • found inadmissible to Canada for misrepresentation; and
  • barred for five years from applying for permanent resident status.
How long are language test and Education Credential Assessment (ECA) results valid for?

Language test results are valid for 2 years. They must be valid at the time an application for permanent residence under Express Entry is submitted.

ECAs are valid for 5 years and must also be valid at the time an application for permanent residence under Express Entry is submitted.

Foreign Credential Recognition

If the candidate works in a regulated/licensed profession where can they get information on how to get licensed in Canada?

Each province and territory is responsible for licensing regulated professions and trades through regulatory bodies and apprenticeship authorities. However, there may be different requirements for licensing depending on where you live. Also, some professions are not regulated in every province.

Learn more about the credential recognition process.

Employers may choose to make a job offer to a prospective immigrant for a related occupation while they work toward getting licensed.

If the candidate plan to work in an occupation that is regulated in Canada, should contact the regulatory authority in the province or territory where you plan to live as soon as possible. They can give you information about the process for being licensed.

Please let us know so we can help you with the process

How will Express Entry improve the pathway for newcomers wanting to work in a regulated occupation?

As part of the reforms being made by the Government of Canada to its economic immigration system, improvements to foreign credential recognition (FCR) and the way credentials are recognized are being prioritized.

Increased collaboration with provinces and territories, regulatory authorities, and professional bodies is resulting in the development of steps to make their license and assessment tools accessible to potential immigrants before they come to Canada, giving immigrants a head start on the recognition of their qualifications.

Through an Education Credential Assessment (ECA), a potential Express Entry candidate’s foreign educational credentials are authenticated and assessed against Canadian standards. This allows applicants to have a better sense of how their education fits into the Canadian labour market and helps them make more informed choices about immigration and Canadian career paths. There are currently five organizations designated by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) to deliver ECA services for immigration purposes, including two professional bodies (Medical Council of Canada and the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada). Work is being done to add more organizations and professional bodies to the list of those designated to provide ECA services.

All ECAs included in an Express Entry profile will be validated with the issuing organization when an application for permanent residence is submitted for processing.

Note: Only some people can charge a fee or receive any other type of payment to represent an immigrant or advise on a Canadian immigration proceeding or application. These are:

  • lawyers and paralegals who are members in good standing of a Canadian provincial or territorial law society;
  • notaries who are members in good standing of the Chambre des notaires du Québec; and
  • immigration consultants who are members in good standing of the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council.

Family Sponsorship

Effective October 25, 2012, sponsored spouses or partners must now live together in a legitimate relationship with their sponsor for two years from the day they receive permanent residence status in Canada.

If you are a spouse or partner being sponsored to come to Canada, this applies to you if:

  • You are being sponsored by a permanent resident or Canadian citizen
  • You have been in a relationship for two years or less with your sponsor
  • You have no children in common
  • Your application was received on or after October 25, 2012

If you are a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada, you can sponsor your spouse, conjugal or common-law partner, dependent child (including adopted child) or other eligible relative to become a permanent resident under the Family Class (FC).

If your family member is a permanent resident, they can live, study and work in Canada.

There are two different processes for sponsoring your family under the FC. One process is used for sponsoring your spouse, conjugal or common-law partner and/or dependent children. Another process is used to sponsor other eligible relatives.

Sponsor your spouse, partner or dependent children

If you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, you may sponsor your spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner, or dependent children to come to Canada as permanent residents.

Canadian citizens and permanent residents living in Canada who are 18 years of age or older, may sponsor close relatives or family members who want to become permanent residents of Canada. Sponsors must promise to support the relative or family member and accompanying family members for a period of 3 to 10 years to help them settle in Canada.

You can sponsor your spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, dependent child (including adopted child) or other eligible relative to become a permanent resident.

You can sponsor relatives or family members from abroad if they are:

  • children under 18 years of age whom you intend to adopt;
  • your brothers, sisters, nephews, nieces or grandchildren who are orphans; under the age of 18 and not married or in a common-law relationship; or
  • a relative of any age if you do not have an aunt, uncle or family member from the list above who you could sponsor or who is already a Canadian citizen, Indian or permanent resident.

Note: As of November 5, 2011, NO new applications to sponsor parents or grandparents will be accepted for processing for up to 24 months. This temporary pause will allow us to focus on those applicants already awaiting a decision and reduce the backlog in the parents and grandparents category. This does not affect sponsorship applications for spouses, partners, dependent or adopted children and other eligible relatives.

Spouse or Common-Law Partner in Canada Class

An application for Family Class sponsorship can be made if your spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, or dependent children live inside or outside Canada.

This visa allows applicants who have been residing with their qualifying Canadian partners for a period of 1 year or more in an ongoing relationship. Applicants and their partner need to be in a genuine and continuing relationship and intend to live together in Canada.

The Canadian partner must be willing to live in Canada with the applicant once the visa is granted, and must be willing and able of supporting the applicant without receiving government financial assistance. Once granted, the common-law partner will be given permanent residence and the right to join their sponsoring partner in Canada.

Five-year Sponsorship Bar for persons who were sponsored to come to Canada as a spouse or partner

On March 2, 2012, changes to the eligibility requirements for sponsors came into force. These changes bar a previously-sponsored spouse or partner, from sponsoring a new spouse or partner within five years of becoming a permanent resident, even if the sponsor acquired citizenship during that period. Other members of the family class will not be affected by the regulatory changes.

Provincial Nominee Programs

Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) allow expedited immigration processing to meet provincial labour market and business needs. There are two types of PNP program, the skilled worker PNP for occupations in demand and the business immigration program designed to allow expedited immigration processing for experienced business people wishing to establish a new business invest money or joint ventures with a local business.

Persons who immigrate to Canada under the Provincial Nominee Program have the skills, education and work experience needed to make an immediate economic contribution to the province or territory that nominates them. They are ready to establish themselves successfully as permanent residents in Canada.

To apply under the Provincial Nominee Program, applicants must be nominated by a Canadian province or territory.

Jurisdiction over immigration matters is shared between the federal government and the provinces and territories. Bilateral agreements for federal-provincial/territorial cooperation have been signed with nine provinces and one territory to date:

Please note: A person nominated under the provincial nominee program may apply for a permanent resident visa through Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) under the provincial nominee category.

As a provincial nominee, the applicant will receive faster processing of his or her application for permanent residence.

Quebec-selected skilled workers

Under the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration, Quebec establishes its own immigration requirements and selects immigrants who will adapt well to living in Quebec.

Quebec-selected skilled workers must apply in two stages.

You must first apply to the Quebec government for a certificate of selection (Certificat de sélection du Québec). This is the official document that shows that the Government of Quebec has accepted you to that province. Visit the website of the Quebec ministry that handles immigration for more information on how to obtain a certificate. You will find a link in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page.

After you have been selected by Quebec, you have to make a separate application to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) for permanent residence.

Since April 1, 2014, new rules have been adopted regarding the maximum number of applications for a Certificat de sélection du Québec submitted by permanent workers, investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed workers that will be received by the Ministère. These new rules will be in effect from April 1, 2014 to March 31, 20151.

The rules pertaining to the maximum number of applications that will be received do not in any way reflect a change in Québec’s immigration objectives . By limiting the number of applications received, the Ministère will be able to process a greater number of pending applications thereby reducing processing times.

Maximum number of applications

New rules regarding the intake and processing of applications will come into effect on April 1, 2015.

Foreign Student component, candidates must be graduates at least 18 years of age, complete an eligible course of study in Quebec leading to a diploma, and have been in Quebec for at least half of the duration of the period of study. Under this category, applicants must intend to reside in Quebec and occupy a job in an eligible occupation after their graduation, must not take an undertaking to return home upon completion of their studies, and must be willing to undertake support of their family for up to 3 months. Successful candidates may apply up to 6 months before the completion of their studies and will also be required to satisfy language proficiency requirements of moderate oral proficiency in French.

Fill out our immigration assessment to see if you qualify.